Dr. Julie Damron

2 minutes reading time (347 words)

Holiday treats from table pose threat


By Dr. Julie Damron
Stockton Record November 11th, 2008

Soon millions of people will share food and festivities with family and friends. Unfortunately this frivolity is often followed by trips to the veterinarian and lost pets.

People food can cause a multitude of problems in animals. Don't feed pets spicy, salty or fatty foods from a holiday dinner. Even small amounts can trigger pancreatitis, a very serious and potentially deadly illness similar to food poisoning. Make sure all your guests know not to feed the animals from the table.

Be sure to keep bones out of reach. Both turkey and chicken bones break easily and can become lodged in your pet's throat or damage the stomach and intestines.

To help pets feel included, provide safe treats. Also, continue with your pet's normal feeding schedule; this can help alleviate stress and also makes it less likely that your buddy will get into something that he or she shouldn't. Keep them away from chocolate, grapes, raisins and onions, since these can cause a range of problems.

Cooking paraphernalia can be a source of health issues for your pets. Items used to cover food or wrap foods, such as plastic wrap, aluminum foil, paper towels and wax paper can be enticing to animals. Pets will try to lick the food off the packaging and may ingest the coverings, which can cause intestinal problems such as blockages, twists, or vomiting and diarrhea. The same rules apply to string, toothpicks or other items that have touched food

Depending on the temperament of your dog and/or cat, he or she may enjoy visiting with guests. You can include your canine companion in the family walk. If you don't walk, playing in the yard can also help to keep your buddy involved and happy. If you do have your pets visit with company, it is also important to provide some quiet time.

Make sure your pets have collars with current contact information. With guests entering and exiting your home, your pet could get out, and it's important he or she has proper identification.

Contact Julie Damron at .

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Sunday, 18 November 2018