Sierra Veterinary Clinic: Pet Blog

Tips on caring for your pets from the Veterinarians and staff of Sierra Veterinary Clinic in Stockton, California.

The Importance of Microchipping Your Pet

These are my two “kids” Sargent Tucker and General Patton. If they ever got lost, I would be more than devastated. They are definitely house dogs, and I do believe they would never want to be without me. However, I will admit they have run out of the house or backyard to go see the dog across the street… More than once. They definitely don’t go far, but it scares me to death. Luckily, they both have microchips!

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Registered Veterinary Technician Week: October 14-20

There are three words that can distinguish a Registered Veterinary Technician from a veterinarian:

Diagnosing. 
Prescribing. 
Performing. 

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Heart Disease and Your Pet

Heart disease is a more common problem for pets than you probably realize. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), approximately 10% of all dogs in the U.S. have heart disease, and heart disease affects 1 of every 10 cats.

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Hypothyroidism and Your Dog

Hypothyroidism is the most common hormone imbalance in dogs. Also known as thyroid disease, hypothyroidism usually occurs in canines over 5 years of age. While any breed of dog can develop this thyroid problem, breeds like Great Danes, Doberman Pinschers, Irish Setters, Golden Retrievers, Boxers, and Dachshunds are more commonly affected.

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Pet Wellness: Understanding Common Tests for Your Pet

When it comes to our furry family members, we have their best interests at heart. Annual exams are the best way to keep our pets healthy and in their best shape, and along with a yearly check up comes recommended tests for every life stage.

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It’s National Walk Your Pet Month!

January is Walk Your Pet Month, and the perfect time to kick off your New Year’s resolutions by heading out for some fresh air with your four legged friends! From bonding and social benefits to boosting your health and mood, daily walks are beneficial to both you and your dog.

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Thanksgiving and Holiday Pet Safety

The annual Thanksgiving and holiday feasts are delicious for us, but did you know that these special gatherings can actually be harmful to your pets? It’s tempting to spoil our furry family members with treats from the dinner table or show them some love with leftover scraps, but holiday food can make your pets seriously sick.

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Protecting Your Pets from Wildfire Smoke

California’s wildfires and traveling smoke cause unhealthy air quality in our area, and weather and climate experts warn that wildfire season in the state may now be year-round. Wildfire smoke affects more than just people—the smoke can also be hazardous to pets, horses, and other wildlife. If you can see or experience the symptoms of bad air, there’s a good chance that your pet may also feel the effects.

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Adopt-a-Dog Month: Provide a Shelter Dog with a Loving Home

October is here, reminding us of National Adopt-a-Dog Month and the perfect time to welcome a furry family member into your home! Adopted pets are loyal, intelligent, and loving, and rescuing a dog is a wonderful way to give back. Whether you’re ready for your first dog or expanding your family, consider adopting your next best friend and offering a lifetime of love and care to a shelter or rescue dog.

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Obesity Is a Huge Problem for Pets

Did you know that the leading health threat for your pet is obesity? With 55% of dogs and 60% of cats tipping the scales as overweight or obese, those few extra pounds can quickly pile up into a multitude of health problems. Overweight dogs and cats are prone to arthritis, heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer, joint and bone issues, and shorter life spans.

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Why Does My Pet Need an Annual Exam?

Have you ever wondered if your pet really needs an annual physical exam? Your dog or cat seems perfectly healthy, so is a regular wellness exam necessary?

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Tips for Safe Travel with Your Pet

Whether you’re hitting the road in a car, traveling by RV, or taking to the skies, keep these tips in mind to ensure the best possible experience when traveling with your pet.

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Flea and Tick Protection for Pets

The sun is shining, the days are growing longer, and trees are in full bloom after a long and rainy season for the San Joaquin Valley. This spring will be a welcome relief to many of us who have endured one of the longest, wettest winters in the last 20 years. Your furry household members are also eager to get outside and enjoy the dry weather.

As your dogs and cats spend increased time outside, flea and tick care becomes critical. The lack of freeze this past winter means significantly increased flea and tick activity here in Stockton this spring. Plan to stay one step ahead and start your prevention now, before you start to see fleas and ticks on your pet—once you can see them, they’re already nesting in your home or yard.

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Guest — Amanda George
What an informative article and what sounds like a great product! My dogs and cat are my babies, and I try to keep them as clean ... Read More
Monday, 09 December 2019 01:10
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Why Is My Pet So Itchy?

If your pet is constantly itchy and scratching, it’s time to bring your furry family member into the clinic. Pet skin issues can be acute (temporary) or chronic (persistent), and caused by a variety of factors, including environmental allergies, flea allergies, and food allergies. Instead of just treating symptoms, it’s important to get to the root of the problem to bring your dog or cat relief.

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Guest — steele
I didn't know that intradermal allergy testing can identify specific environmental allergy triggers in dogs and cats. I have notic... Read More
Wednesday, 10 April 2019 15:31
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Introducing Sierra Veterinary Clinic’s New Loyalty Program

We’re excited to announce the launch of our new automated loyalty program! Available through our free mobile app or Pet Page portal, this exciting program rewards you for every visit. We want to thank you for being a client and choosing Sierra Veterinary Clinic to provide your pet with advanced veterinary care!

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Recent Comments
Guest — Irene Gill
Does the coins earned depend on the amount for the visit?
Tuesday, 10 July 2018 16:45
Guest — April D Holmes
I want to thank the girls who took care of my beautiful short-haired black and white tuxedo Kitty, Chief BUDDY Blackfoot..??... Read More
Thursday, 03 October 2019 20:28
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Heartworm Disease and Your Pet

Did you know that all pets are at risk for heartworm disease? Heartworm is a serious and potentially fatal disease that can affect all pets, even indoor dogs and cats. The disease is caused by heartworms, foot-long worms that live in the heart, lungs, and blood vessels of affected pets. Adult heartworms can grow up to 14 inches and cause heart failure, lung disease, organ damage, and even death.

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How to Prevent Pet Shedding

You love your pets, but unwanted fur all over the house or on your furniture can be frustrating. While hair shedding is a natural process for all dogs and cats, preventing or controlling shedding is a common concern for most pet owners.

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Canine Flu: What You Should Know

Flu season is in full swing, and humans aren’t the only ones sick. Dogs across Northern California are coming down with the flu, and researchers from UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine believe it could spread throughout the Central Valley region.

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Pet Cancer Awareness

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death among pets, which is why we’re committed to raising awareness about the devastating impact of pet cancer. All pets are at risk for developing cancer, and just like humans, pets can develop many different types of cancer. The good news is that with early detection and treatment, cancer is frequently treatable.

Cancer in pets
Neoplasia is the uncontrolled growth of cells or tissues in the body, and the abnormal growth is called a tumor or neoplasm. Like us, pets can develop neoplasia in almost any organ or tissue in their body. Benign (non-cancerous) tumors grow slowly, and do not invade the surrounding tissue or spread throughout the body. Malignant (cancerous) tumors grow unpredictably, and can invade the surrounding tissue or spread to other parts of the body.

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Diabetes and Your Pet

November is National Diabetes Month, and we’re joining with veterinarians across the nation to focus on this disease that claims the lives of thousands of pets every year. Diabetes Mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is becoming increasingly common among both dogs and cats. Left untreated, the devastating disease is potentially fatal. With early detection and treatment, diabetic pets can continue to live normal, healthy lives.

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How to Keep Your Lawn Green with Dogs

If you have dogs, you understand the challenges of keeping your lawn lush and green. Lawn burn is a common issue for many dog owners, and occurs when your dog’s urine damages the lawn due to an alkaline pH, concentrated urine, and nitrogen load.

Urine pH and Nitrogen Load
Ideally, dogs should have a slightly acidic urine pH of between 6 and 6.5. If your dog’s urine pH is above 7, the higher pH will burn your lawn and could lead to struvite stones, bladder stones caused by alkaline urine. To check your pet’s urine pH at home, you can purchase pH strips and collect a urine sample from your dog in the morning. A dog’s urine pH can be reduced with a low-carb, grain-free diet.

Dogs on a very high protein diet can also produce urine that causes lawn burn. When protein is broken down, nitrogen is excreted. Higher amounts of protein lead to increased nitrogen, and a greater chance of lawn burn. If your lawn is heavily fertilized, it may be receiving near maximum levels of nitrogen already, and the additional amount of nitrogen in your dog’s urine could damage the grass.

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Guest — Spencer
Very informative and useful article, I love gardening and was searching for this type of information because I always want to see ... Read More
Sunday, 04 November 2018 08:31
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Leptospirosis and Your Pet

After a warm winter with above average rainfall in San Joaquin County, Leptospirosis is a growing concern for pet owners in our area. Commonly known as Lepto, this potentially deadly disease is caused by infection with the Leptospira bacteria.

The bacteria live in soil and water, and the disease is spread when your pet comes in contact with contaminated water or urine from contaminated animals. The bacteria enters the body through the eyes, nose, mouth, or an open wound. Mice and rats can spread the disease to your pet, and it can also be passed through the placenta from a mother dog to her puppies. While dogs are most commonly affected by Lepto, the disease can affect cats and can pass from animals to people.

Leptospirosis was once confined to rural or hunting dogs, but more and more household pets are contracting the disease. Last month, three pets at the clinic tested positive for Lepto, and new data from animal experts suggests that urban dogs are just as likely to be infected as rural dogs.

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Pet Dental Care: Why It’s Important

Dental care is an important aspect of your pet’s overall health, and if left unchecked, dental problems can lead to other serious health issues. According to the American Veterinary Dental College, most dogs and cats are experiencing some form of dental disease by age three. Pet owners don’t always recognize the early signs of oral health issues, and dental disease is the number one undetected illness for both dogs and cats. Without effective preventive measures, the disease process will only advance with age. Routine pet dental care—both at home and in-clinic—can help your pet live a long and healthy life.

Home Care
Ideally, dental wellness begins at puppyhood and kittenhood, when it’s easy to get in the habit of routine preventative care. Puppies and kittens are usually very willing to let you rub their teeth with gauze, and later introduce a finger brush or small toothbrush and enzymatic toothpaste.

In addition to regular brushing, our clinic offers a variety of dental care products to help you maintain your pet’s oral health at home. OraVet Dental Hygiene Chews clean teeth and block bacteria to help prevent plaque, calculus (tartar), and bad breath. Dental treats can help reduce plaque and tartar formation while your pet chews, and water additives are products you can add to your pet’s drinking water to freshen your pet’s breath and prevent plaque accumulation. Oral rinses, gels, and sprays all contain active ingredients that help fight plaque and bacteria.

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Guest — bram
That is a good point you made about having regular examinations for your pet. Sometimes a pet just won't have any visible signs of... Read More
Tuesday, 23 October 2018 16:17
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Beware of Holiday Health Hazards for your Pet

The holidays are a great time for baking, decorating, and gift giving, but all the festivities can present some unexpected hazards for your pets, most of which wouldn't be obvious. Plants, treats, decorations, and even the busyness of the season can pose threats to your pet's health which wouldn't be an issue the rest of the year.

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Breast Cancer Awareness Month

As you may know, October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. We likely all know someone affected by this disease, and unfortunately, our companion animals are affected too. Mammary Gland Neoplasia is something we see in our patients here at Sierra Veterinary Clinic, and it is the most common tumor in intact female dogs. Certain breeds at increased risk include Spaniels, Pointers, Poodles, Dachshunds, German Shepherds, and Yorkshire Terriers. One of the risk factors is related to the timing of when you spay your pet, so this is also a good reason to spay early. According to the Clinical Veterinary Advisor, intact females and females spayed after two years of age have a sevenfold greater risk of mammary neoplasia compared to those spayed before age 6 months.

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Halloween Pet Safety

Halloween can be a fun time for you and your pet as long as you follow some simple pet safety tips. Unfortunately holidays are a common time for pet emergencies. On halloween in particular, pets are more likely to eat things they shouldn't and escape out of the house. Here are a few potential problems to be aware of.

Candy: This may seem obvious but you should never let your pet eat any halloween candy. Any candy containing chocolate, especially dark and bittersweet, xylitol, a sweetener, or raisins is very bad for them and can be fatal. Make sure you and your kids put all the candy in a place unreachable by your pet. Don't let them get into the wrappers either. It's likely the wrapper still has the smell and taste of candy on it and if ingested can create a blockage.

Costumes: It's fine to dress your pet in a halloween costume, you just need to make sure it's safe and comfortable for them. It needs to fit well and not be too tight or loose or impair them in any way. Supervise them while they are in costume.

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SVC voted Best of San Joaquin

Thanks for once again voting Sierra Veterinary Clinic “Best of San Joaquin” in 2016! We appreciate your ongoing support and the many relationships that we’ve built in the Stockton community. We are honored to have you all as our clients.

As Stockton’s leading full-service veterinary facility, we’ve been committed to providing the best possible routine and advanced care and services for your pets from the start. Thanks for thinking so highly of us, and for choosing our team of experienced doctors, technicians, and support staff as the best in San Joaquin County.

Are you a new client? Check out our new clients page for special offers and discounts.

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Keeping Your Senior Pet Healthy

Did you know that senior pets have special needs and may be faced with a new set of age-related conditions? Thanks to improved veterinary care and dietary habits, pets are now living longer than ever before. The downside to aging is the possibility of health problems and behavioral changes for your pet.

First, it’s important to understand when a pet is considered a senior. Cats and small dogs are usually considered a senior at 7 years of age. Larger breed dogs typically have shorter life spans, and are considered a senior at 6 years of age.

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When Fido’s Fangs Flare: Dog Bite Prevention Week May 15 - 21

From nips to bites to actual attacks, dog bites are a serious problem. Even the sweetest, cutest dog can bite if provoked. Approximately 800,000 dog bite victims require medical attention in the US every year. Children are the most frequent victims of dog bites, making up half of all victims, followed by the elderly and postal carriers. Even dogs can be victims of dog bites. Fortunately, most dog bites are preventable by following some common sense tips, teaching children how to behave around dogs and training your own pet.

Tips for Everyone

Keep these tips in mind If you encounter an unfamiliar dog.

  • If a dog approaches to sniff you, stay still. In most cases, the dog will go away when it determines you are not a threat.
  • If you are threatened by a dog, remain calm. Don’t scream or yell. If you say anything, speak calmly and firmly. Avoid eye contact. Try to stay still until the dog leaves, or back away slowly until the dog is out of sight. Don’t turn and run.
  • If you fall or are knocked to the ground, curl into a ball with your hands over your head and neck. Protect your face.

Keeping the Kids Safe

Most dog bites affecting young children occur during everyday activities and while interacting with familiar dogs. Parents and caregivers should:

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Parvovirus is a real threat for your pet

With the warmer weather, all of us are spending more time outside enjoying the sunshine, and that includes our pets. Unfortunately this always means we see a spike in Parvovirus infections, and this year is no different.

Parvo is a highly contagious virus that is spread through oral contact with infected feces. As disgusting as that sounds, it could be as simple as your pet walking through an area that contains infected feces, and then licking his feet afterward. Even walking through an infected area yourself can contaminate your clothing and shoes, and is often enough to infect a pet when you return home. Many scientists suspect that flies can also pick up the virus and spread it to your pet by landing on his face.

Parvo most commonly affects puppies age 3-10 months, but is also a threat to older dogs who are immunocompromised, have had an incomplete set of vaccinations, or have had no vaccinations. We also see occasional breakthrough infections in fully vaccinated animals, but this is extremely rare. Puppies are at the highest risk because their immune systems haven't had a chance to fully develop, and their vaccines haven't been completed.

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Have a Heart for Heartworm Awareness

You’ve probably heard of “heartworm” disease, but what do you really know about it? Heartworm is a dangerous disease and should be a genuine concern for you if you’re a dog owner. Luckily, prevention is easy and affordable.

What is Heartworm Disease?

Once considered a parasite mainly of southern climates, heartworm disease is now considered a real risk for pets in all 50 states. Unfortunately, it is estimated that 1 million dogs in the U.S. suffer with heart- worm disease today.

Heartworm is a life-threatening parasite transmitted by mosquitoes and is caused by worms that manifest themselves in your dog’s heart, lungs, and arteries. These parasites will mature into adults, mate, and produce offspring. If left untreated, their numbers can increase to several hundred worms and may grow to be 14-inch-long adults.

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The Importance of a Comprehensive Panel

Cooper's Story

My dog Cooper is 4 years old. In October I noticed a few things that were not normal for him. He was shedding a lot more hair and was waking me up more at night to go outside to use the facilities. When I brought him in, I spoke to Dr. Patterson and Dr. Yao about the issues he was having they suggested that we send out a comprehensive panel with urine just to make sure everything looked the way it is supposed to. The next day Dr. Yao sat me down and told me that Cooper was in stage 1 Kidney Disease. I was upset because there’s not much you can do but to slow down the progression of the Disease by changing his diet. I knew that this was going to be a challenge. Explaining it to my daughter was hard. She was no longer allowed to sneak Cooper snacks. I explained to her that there were still foods he could have like bananas, apples, green beans and carrots. We now make Cooper banana ice cream once and a while.

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Wellness Exams: The Easiest Way to Keep on Top of Your Pet’s Health

Just like we do, our furry friends need regular wellness exams to stay their healthiest.  What may seem like a simple checkup really is the foundation for preventing more serious health problems and potentially not only saving money, but your pet’s life.  Here are some guidelines and tips for getting the most out of your pet’s wellness visits. 

The frequency of wellness exams coincides with the different points in an animal’s life.  Puppies and kittens, for example, should see a veterinarian every three weeks for exams and booster vaccinations until they are16 weeks old.  Adults typically need an annual wellness exam.  Seniors usually need to be seen twice a year because their health can change more quickly than younger pets. 

A wellness visit typically includes a head-to-toe physical exam.  It also may include a check for growths and masses on the skin; checking the underbelly and groin for tenderness or swelling; an examination of the eyes, ears and nose for obstructions; and an oral exam to look for signs of gum disease, growths or tooth issues.  Routine blood work and fecal exams also will be conducted to provide a baseline for evaluating changes or trends in your pet’s health that the physical may not reveal.  Other diagnostics may include testing for heartworm disease and internal parasites.  To ensure a happy, healthy pet, nutrition and behavior also will be discussed. 

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Guest — Bram
Thanks for explaining what will happen the actual exam. That brings me a little more comfort! I am just nervous for my dog, Henry ... Read More
Wednesday, 05 September 2018 14:31
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The many benefits of professional grooming

Anyone can wash their canine or feline companions at home; but there are several advantages to professional grooming and bathing.

Groomers can bathe, comb, trim and possibly shave your companion's coat. All dogs benefit from routine bathing. It is an important way to remove dirt, oils, and dead hair; thus helping to improve the coat condition and reduce matting. For long haired dogs, this is something that should take place at least every 6-8 weeks. Bathing can also be a pivotal component in controlling allergies, and treating various skin conditions.

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Feline resorptive lesions… Ouch!

This Is Moe.

He is one of our awesome veterinary technician’s fur-baby. (Please don’t worry about his eye. It developed that way and it is not painful).

Here are two x-rays of his fourth premolar on the left side from a dental cleaning we did for him a couple of months ago.

Notice the large, dark hole in the fourth premolar. That is a feline resorptive lesion. Amy is not feeding Mo too many sweets because they are not caused by sugar in the diet and although they are commonly seen with plaque and gingivitis, we don’t know how they are related. The most important thing to know about them is that they are painful.

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Polydactyl (Many Toes)

Medical term originating in Greek “Poly” pertains to many and “Dactyl” pertaining to the toes/fingers.

Polydactyl cats have more than normal amount of toes usually on the front feet but they can also be on the back feet. Normal cats have 18 toes polydactyls usually have up to 28 toes.

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Amy's Cold Laser Therapy Story

One of our RVTs, Amy, was recently presented with a unique opportunity to use our Veterinary Cold Therapy Laser on an injured horse. Amy has enjoyed this experience so much that she wrote up her story for us to share with you:

This sweet girl is one of our latest laser therapy patients.  She is a show and driving horse owned by Richard and Melanie Brandstad. One day in early January Dr. Luckars asked me if I would ever consider doing laser on a horse, with no question I automatically said yes, not thinking anything of it I went on about my day. In the following days I was in contact with Richard and we set up a day to meet at the Sargent Equestrian Center were Hannah stays. So in between work or on weekends I would make my way out to see Hannah for her laser therapy.

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What happens when your dog tests positive for Heartworm

Heartworm is a disease that is transmitted by mosquitoes. It is an issue in our area, and indoor pets are also at risk. Prevention of this condition is easy and inexpensive, especially when you compare it to the expense of trying to treat the disease, the pain it causes your pet, and often the heartbreak of losing your pet.

In cats there is no treatment, and 1-2 worms can result in death. For canines, the treatment involves using a medication that is a form of arsenic. The treatment process itself has risks and is expensive; the exact therapy process and risk is dependant upon your pet's stage of illness.

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Avoiding Zoonotic Disease

They're our best friends, but our pets sometimes carry some nasty bugs that can make us sick too. Zoonotic diseases, or zoonoses, are infections or conditions that can be passed from animals to humans. While most pets pose minimal zoonotic risk to their owners, the risk is higher for those who have weakened immune systems, the elderly, or pregnant women.

The most common conditions carried by our pets are intestinal parasites such as Salmonellosis, Giardia, or Cryptosporidium; skin conditions like scabies; or worms, including Ringworm, Hookworm, and Roundworms. More serious conditions such as Rabies and Lyme disease can also be passed to humans in certain cases.

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Springtime Pest and Parasite Prevention

The weather has warmed up, and both you and your pets are probably spending more time outside. The warmer weather also increases exposure to fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, and other parasites, which can cause problems ranging from annoying itching, all the way to potentially fatal conditions like Heartworm.

This spring promises to be even worse than normal due to the mild winter and early warm weather. We're already seeing an unusually high number of cases relating to fleas and ticks coming into the clinic.

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Help us collect donations for Animal Friends Connection!

Help us collect donations for pets who are awaiting adoption through Animal Friends Connection. They're constantly in need of basic supplies to help care for the animals in the shelter, and this month if you donate one of the items listed below and drop it off at Sierra Vet Clinic, we'll thank you with a voucher good for $5 off any product or service we offer.

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2014 Year in Review

2014 Sierra Vet Clinic Year in Review Video

We've had a great year here at Sierra Veterinary Clinic, and we wanted to share some of the special moments with you through this video.

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A Holiday Treat for your Pet

We're all likely to put on a few extra pounds this Christmas season, but remember that the treats you love aren't so good for your pet. Don't worry though - we've got a recipe here for dog biscuits that is healthy for your pet and veterinarian approved!

Download the Christmas Dog Biscuit Recipe

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Is your pet in pain?

We are all getting older, and that includes your pets. As pets and people age, those nagging aches and pains seem to get worse and worse. There are many factors which can contribute to joint pain in your pet, including lack of physical exercise, poor diet, weight control, and some medications. As we deal with this cold winter weather, joint pain which may normally be manageable can be magnified, to the point where it begins affecting your pet's daily life.

Symptoms of your pet's pain can be easy or difficult to identify. Obvious symptoms include lethargy, stiffness, limping, or reluctance to move. Other behaviors which indicate your much your pet might be suffering include aggressive or defensive reactions when touched, unusual barking for no reason, or uncharacteristic hiding.

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Simple and Inexpensive Pet Tips

There are several simple and inexpensive things that pet owners can do to extend a dog or cat's life.

Brush you pet's teeth routinely. A toothbrush and a pet friendly tooth paste costs less than $15. It is best to start this practice when your dog or cat is young. It is a wonderful way to help prevent the build up of plaque on your companion's teeth and reduce periodontal disease. Dental disease is the number one undetected illness for both dogs and cats. Infection in the mouth is not only painful but can also lead to illness elsewhere in the body. This routine effort is great for you buddy's comfort and longevity. It will also save you money by resulting in less involved and potentially less frequent dental cleanings.

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Symptoms of Osteoarthritis in pets can be easily missed

Osteoarthritis is the progressive and permanent deterioration of joint cartilage. This can happen over time with age, and/or may be secondary to underlying congenial bone or joint abnormalities. It develops slowly in both older dogs and cats; symptoms can be easily missed, especially in the earlier stages. Large breed canines (dogs weighing over 50 lbs.) tend to have more severe problems.

Problems can start with difficulty or a delay in getting up and down. Dogs or cats may not jump on and off of furniture with the same ease as in the past. Over time muscle loss can take place along the back legs, front legs, or along spine. Limping at a walk or run can happen occasionally or frequently. Difficulty posturing to have a bowel movement is also fairly common. Pets may not want to be as active as in the past: less likely to play fetch, or go on long walks. On examination, there is generally some degree of tenderness at the hips, shoulders, elbows, knees, and/or along the back. Colder weather does seem to aggravate this condition.

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Cat Scratch Fever

Cat scratch disease is an illness that affects people, cats, dogs, and other wildlife. This syndrome was first identified in the 1950’s. People often experience fever, low energy, skin papules, and lymph node enlargement with the potential for much more advanced illness. In the United States the incidence is about 9.3 cases per 100,000 people annually-Jackson et all 1993. It is transmitted to humans from infected cat scratches and bites. A causative agent, Rochalimaea henselae was not identified until 1992; and the following year it was reclassified as Bartonella henselae a gram-negative bacteria. Since then, additional types of Bartonella that cause infections in people have also been identified.

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What is diabetes, and how does it harm my pet?

November is National Diabetes Month, and along with veterinarians across the nation, we're focusing on this disease that claims the lives of many thousands of pets every year.

Unfortunately Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is becoming more and more common among both dogs and cats. Left untreated, this condition is fatal. However with proper treatment and careful management, pets who suffer from this disease can continue to live normal, healthy lives.

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Ever wondered how old your pet really is?

You've probably heard the formula: multiply your pet's age by 7 to come up with their human equivalent age. While this simple formula is a reasonable estimation, your pet's equivalent age is actually affected by many other factors, including species, breed, and weight.

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Summertime Safety Tips for your Pet

Summertime is upon us, and throughout Northern California people are venturing outside for some fun in the sun. Pets are great companions on our outdoor adventures, provided some basic safety tips are observed. 

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With the recent shelter-in-place order issued for our community, we wanted to take a moment to let you know that we are open and here for you and your pet!

However with the safety of our clients, patients and employees in mind, our lobby will be closed until further notice. Veterinary services will remain available during our normal business hours with a few adjustments to how we receive you and your pet, including:

Appointments & Medication/Food Pickup

Upon arriving at the clinic, please remain in your vehicle and contact us via phone @ 209-477-4841 to let our team know you have arrived. A team member will then meet you at your vehicle to escort your pet inside for the appointment and/or deliver any products you need to pick up. Payments can be made over the phone, from your vehicle.

We ask that no one who is experiencing flu-like symptoms or who has been exposed to someone who has tested positive for the COVID-19 virus enter the facility at this time.

Refill Requests

To submit a medication or food refill request, please contact us via phone, email or online refill request form. We will contact you when your refill is ready and deliver it to your vehicle upon your arrival.


Thank you for your patience and understanding, and for helping us keep our community safe!

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